Chief Security Officer’s Log

We had a very slow month, nothing to exciting happened. We went over some simulations in case of a Red alert made sure everyone knew where to go and what they needed to do. We also did a weapons check, count and cleaned all weapons.
Made sure everyone knew how to properly discharge and fire all weapons. We will continue weapons training into the next month.

In Service,
Lieutenant Commander Anzaldi, CSO

Chief Engineering Officer’s Log

All of the teams have been extremely busy over the past several weeks as the environmental controls have been severely malfunctioning, causing extreme cold temperatures throughout the ship, sprinkled intermittently with fairly warm temperatures. It has caused many illnesses among the crew, so we also had to use parts of engineering to help out sick bay.

I believe my crew has sorted it all out, however, and we will move on to upgrading various computer systems for the next month.

In Service,
Lieutenant JG Bender, CEO

Chief Science Officer’s Log

Our Chief Science Officer spend the majority of the report period in medical after undergoing major surgery. Studies were done on 21st century surgical and pain relief methods. A lot of reading and preparing for upcoming missions was caught up on, as well as study on the effects of home confinement on the mental health of a recovering patient.

In Service,
Lieutenant Commander Brunelle, CSO

Chief Navigational Officer’s Log

Navigation has not had much work done in the time that the Narragansett was stationed at Earth Station Titan due to changes in command. However as there is now an acting Captain, I will be working with the Admiral on plotting a course for a new mission to be started within the next week. During the time at Earth Station Titan, I have worked with the new navigation systems to better understand it, and to see if there are ways to speed up plotting new courses that may be quicker and or safer to travel.

In Service,
Lieutenant JG Nelson, CNO

Chief Medical Officer’s Log

Quiet month in sickbay. NP Tribble has used the down time to coop up in her lab hatching goodness knows what new scheme. I’ve been catching up with the administrative work, which is my least favorite part of the job. Interestingly enough, when I try to delegate, NP Tribble manages to be extremely busy with a critical juncture of an experiment. One of these days I’ll have a severe word… but I’ve also been using the down time to have a vacation from my Nurse Practitioner…
I’ve been told to expect new personnel before we leave Titan. I look forward to meeting them.

In Service,
Commander D. Taylor, CMO

Chief Tactical Officer’s Log

The engagement at Deep Space 9 was brief, but devastating.
I was in Torpedo Room 1 when we came under fire. Things went downhill rapidly. I lost four men in the first attack. Consoles were detonating left and right. 
We were able to maintain torpedo capability well in to the engagement, however some sort of cascade failure in structural integrity caused a collapse in the section around the torpedo room. Access was cut off, and I was trapped under some rubble.
I don’t know how long I was unconscious, but when I came around two of my techs had gotten me unburied and had managed to set my broken leg with the emergency osteogenic stimulator.
Once it became obvious that we could not dig our way out, we spent the remainder of our time attempting to establish communications with the bridge. There was a brief, harrowing time when we were trapped with an armed quantum torpedo on the rack, but LTJG Nelson was able to transport it out safely.
We briefly lost communications again, but Engineering was able to get a team to cut through the rubble with plasma cutters. 
As we now sit docked at DS9 and the yard-dogs swarm about the ‘Gansett, I can’t help but ponder my own mortality. Death in the face of the enemy is part of the job. Staring down a live torpedo that could vaporize you and your men, well, that’s not.

Captain’s Log, Supplemental

The USS Narragansett has taken heavy damage. We had to eject the warp core. We suffered many hull breaches and many casualties. Support ships are inbound and we are doing our best to repair what we can with parts on hand. I’m afraid the Commodore will be disappointed with the state of the ship. Life support is stable at 35% and auxiliary power is holding.

We lost a lot of good people today, and the fleet lost many, many ships. I remember when we spent our time exploring the galaxy rather than fighting in wars. I miss those days.

Chief Medical Officer’s Log

I have returned from maternity leave a few days ago. Captain Taylor and I welcomed a new cadet into our family on the 17th of August. Alice Amanda Taylor was 7 lbs 12oz. And 19 inches – came into this world kicking and screaming and hasn’t stopped since.
I find Sickbay in surprisingly good shape and we’ll stocked. Nurse Tribble said she was “just doing my job”. After I get caught up with patient files and reports I will definitely investigate this claim… especially since, among the reports I found that our Nurse T had completed all courses and tests to become a nurse practitioner. All that’s left is a 120 hours of supervised practice. Well, I suppose I can grit my teeth and bear it. I could, after all, use the help.
Chief Medical Officer’s log, supplemental
I walked in on Nurse Tribble wrangling a large, malodorous beast from the nurse’s lounge back into the lab… After having some severe words and issuing serious threats, I got her to confess that it was one of her continued experiments on fungi that… “got a little out of control” and had “a little stroll around the ship”. “He’s really just a harmless, fuzzy, perhaps a little too ambulatory, and overgrown mold…” After some more discouraging words and extra duty assignments she promised she would take better care to keep her experiments contained. I’m the last person to dissuade scientific research, but this is a starship, Not the Island of Dr. Moreau!
Commander Dora Taylor, Chief Medical Officer

Operations Status Report

All Departments report systems operating within normal parameters. Tactical is concerned about the wear on the weapons systems with their current ruining status. I have asked Engineering to increase the frequency of maintenance to compensate.

Department head reports continue to trickle in. It is nice to be back from leave.

Science Status Report

It was an active summer for the Sciences division. Extensive research on wet pressure heat vs. dry roasting heat for primitive anthropology research on 21st century human habit of preparation of carbon based life forms for protein sources. Our results suggest wet, high pressure with CH3CO-OH and crushed dried herbaceous plants and NaCl, followed by dry roasting over open flame with a wet, spicy blend of fruits and sugars is a sensorily pleasant way to prepare the ribs of a porcine life form.

Some emergency physics research involving shuttle craft and low speed impacts with solid immovable objects. Our department is still recovering the resources from that one.
Many of our experiments resulted in trips to sick bay. Will attempt to do more virtual experimentation in the holodeck vs. Practical experimentation in the future. Except with that anthropological research because it turns out that primitive carbon based porcine life forms are delicious.

Working with engineering on severe temperature and humidity fluctuations, which seem to have settled for the time being.

LLAP

Cyn Brunelle, Sciences